Sunday, May 15, 2011

I have a confession to make....

Well, I have many, but today I'm going to keep it to the crafty kind.

I. LOVE. TO. IRON.

That's right I said it, and I am sure many of you think I must be nuts. Iron? Of all the things you could be doing, certainly that can't be on the top of your list? It is as relaxing to me as it is to feeding fabric to my machine. Even when I was a child it was how I got out of doing my other chores. Seriously! I kid you not! Think about it at 10 or 12 wouldn't you prefer to iron ...oppose to...Ummm... I don't know... scrubbing bath tub?

I have even considered writing a tutorial on the proper way to iron a dress shirt for my blog, but fear not, I won't. I think Martha already has that one covered.

But since this is a quilting blog and ironing is a big part of that, I thought I would share a few of my thoughts on the subject.

I recently finished my double hour glass quilt (I will share more on that later) and I took some pictures along the way. As you can see I have been thinking about this for a while now.

And if you are interested I used this quilt tutorial from Cluck Cluck Sew.


First, I ironed my seam to the dark side, because it will help me line up my seam in the next step.


See how it lines up so nicely? I wish there was a way you could feel how flat it lays. It fits together perfectly.
In second picture I wanted to show you how it is more important to me that the seam is going to line up opposed to the edge. Give yourself a little wiggle room.


In this step of making the block I iron all my seams going in the same direction. Left or right it is your choice just ALL in the same direction.

Then I flip and iron the top. There isn’t any real reason for this step just an old habit and an opportunity to double check my work.  I hate getting in too deep and then having to pull out the seam ripper.


See how pretty they all look.

 

Again, see how the seams fit in nicely and lock into place.
This is how it looks opened up but not ironed.


Again, I will iron my seam to one side and all in the same direction.
I love when everything lines up so perfectly. *heaven*

Then when I am sewing my blocks together I will open up my seams. This is definitely where you can see some reduction in bulk. This is also the step I am more likely to use some starch. I want everything to be nice and crisp for when I sandwich my quilt together.

A Side Note: Another great way to reduce bulk and make sure your seams a line is to trim your blocks before you sew them together. I know this is such a tedious task but it really does make a world of difference.


I hope you all got a little something out of what I have shared today and I hope it helps you make an educated decision on how you would like to iron your blocks. Remember there is no right or wrong way to do this. Just my way! Just kidding, sorry I couldn’t resist. I just wanted to know if I still had your attention.

If you are interested in continuing this discussion on quilting and ironing, please let me know. I would love to hear what you have to say on the subject.


3 comments:

  1. Those are great tips! And your quilt is gorgeous. I have a double hourglass on my wish list of to-makes. :) Nice job!

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  2. Beautiful! Great tips! The more I piece, the more I think that the way you press your seams is crucial for accuracy.

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  3. Do you think part of your love of ironing is the iron itself? My mom bought me a Rowenta because my old Black and Decker would spit every now and then. I loved the smoothness of it, and I was so happy at first, but now it leaks tons of water all over the place - my ironing board is constantly wet (so much so that it rusted!). I need a new one, clearly, and I'd love to hear what you think of yours!

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